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Archaeological Shovel Testing in New Brunswick

shovel

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Our scientists, engineers and trained field workers study wildlife, fish, soils, vegetation, surface geology, and terrain around the project to better understand and minimize its effects on the environment. Archaeology is studied to identify and safeguard local indigenous cultural heritage.


How do we do archaeological studies?
1
Conduct an initial walkover with experienced archaeologists.
2
Develop a plan to shovel test high potential sites.
3
Mark the shovel test locations.
4
Mobilize to site.
5
Digging and sieving. Test pits are carefully dug in shallow layers. The earth taken from the test pit is carefully sieved through a mesh screen to identify if any artifacts are present.
6
If cultural artifacts are found, they are documented, collected and protected. Indigenous observers on site are immediately notified and they in turn notify their community.
where

WHERE WILL THE SHOVEL TESTING HAPPEN?
Across New Brunswick, on both Crown and private lands that are within the planned pipeline construction zones of the Canaport Energy East tank terminal and in many areas along the proposed pipeline route.

authorized

IS TRANSCANADA AUTHORIZED TO CONDUCT THIS FIELD STUDY?
Archaeological shovel testing is permitted by Archaeology Services in the Province’s Heritage Branch and is carried out following the strict requirements under the Heritage Conservation Act of New Brunswick.

indigenous

HOW ARE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES INVOLVED?
Each crew has Indigenous field workers actively digging and sieving as well as observers on site to monitor the shovel testing. The overall archaeological program is overseen by an Indigenous archaeologist and regular reports are provided back to Indigenous communities.

questions

QUESTIONS?
If you have any further questions, 
please contact EnergyEast@transcanada.com

EnergyEastPipeline.com

EE4721-TCPL-PR-FS-0085